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CURATOR'S NOTES

The military obsolescence of the siege-engine in modern warfare does not extend to the castellated fortress of individuality. As such, the siege recognised by CADE to be taking place in and around London has many fronts, many weaknesses, many points of pregnability. It would seem the only defensive strategy is to burrow down and away, confuse the enemy with the principle of multiple entrances, even if that enemy is within.

The M25 is the furthest extension of this siege, a protective ring enclosing the citadel of London. Urban movement and the dereliction of properties and businesses at the extremities of the orbital have led to a new demographic - the dogs – moving in, sabotaging the commercial supply routes required to keep London in the grips of law, order and civilisation. A becoming-animal necessitated by scarcity is de rigeur in these last outposts of  human dignity; a pub is no longer a house for consumption and conversation, but a siphon for the drainage of language from the mouth, a re-territorialisation of saliva, teeth, spittle, gasps and grunts, an irruption of genetic bestiality from the wellspring of the English tongue. A siege takes place inside the mouth, teeth block the words from their escape, fortifying this newfound animality against an impotent individuated conscience. A telephone becomes the mechanical means of transmission for these insensible sounds to assail the ears and knock at the doors of reason, a form of harassment which is totally amoral, pointless, nihilistic. Since the sound conveys no meaning it does not ‘threaten’ in the linguistic sense, but rather it threatens us with the loss of meaning. Again, it is this perceived ‘threat’ which leads to the dispute between the residents of a block of flats against an outsider who has ‘moved in’ and invaded their space and their community. The quasi-fascist resident’s association who try and starve him out under the direction of their Führer, a Mrs Fairfax, is surely only one instance of a more widespread phenomena throughout the capital, taking place in each housing block and estate, each micro-community, each workplace, each family; anywhere in which people can be said to ‘belong’.

The South-South Westerly approach of nihilism is an impression created by CADE’s focus of interest and movement throughout the shifting territories of New London, concentrating as he does on these particular areas. This is counteracted by reports of abandoned settlements along the North-North-Westerly perimeter of the M25, and one can only hazard a guess at the strategic advantage gained by the combination of thrust and retreat played-out across this huge swathe of urban topography, a war in which no enemy has yet to be identified. Again, we may verify nothing against CADE’s documentation of events but only resign ourselves to follow his map of the besieged city as it drifts along its unknown course ‘towards (x)’, unconsciously.

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